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PurrForm Raw Cat Food - making the change.

PurrForm Raw Cat Food - making the change.

As a carnivore, a cat's digestion is uniquely adapted to utilise the ingredients in raw food.  When you feed your cat a raw diet, you are replicating what they would eat in the wild.

Thanks to Purrform for this great information about the benefits of feeding their fabulous raw complete cat foods.

Cats’ digestive systems are finely tuned to handle things humans can’t. Their stomachs have a highly acidic environment, which is an excellent deterrent to ingested bacteria and therefore they are ideally adapted to eat raw meat.

You might worry about salmonella. Of course, salmonella is out there, but as with meat you would prepare for yourself, following safe handling practices minimizes the risk.

Cats are very resistant to bacteria such as salmonella, which makes sense for an animal that evolved to exclusively eat raw meat.

Cats have a very short digestive tract and on average it takes 6 to 8 hours for them to digest a meal. This doesn’t give bacteria enough time to proliferate and make the cat unwell.

Compare that to humans, where food takes 36-48 hours to pass through, so we are much more susceptible to bacterial pathogens.

Because our feline friends are obligate carnivores i.e. strict meat eaters, they have less ability to digest grain and high levels of vegetable matter.

Cats have very low thirst drives and are designed to obtain the majority of their water intake from their food. They did, after all, originate in desert environments. For this reason, cats thrive on diets which have high water content, such as raw food. This is why it is so important for them to eat the correct diet.

Cats fed exclusively on water depleted dry diets, produce less volume of higher concentrated urine and therefore may become susceptible to urinary tract problems.

“Nature knows best”, is one of those trite sayings, but – when one stops to think about it – the phrase contains a great truth. In the wild, providing they have a choice, all animals eat what is best for them. For cats this means small prey or, if hunting with others, a share of larger prey.

They are thrifty, too. Nothing is wasted, and that includes the bones. Initially these are ripped, torn, chewed and sucked to remove all the meat and marrow.

So why have pet food companies invested so much money and effort over the last 150 years creating processed and dry foods? Pet food is big business. In the UK alone dog and cat food is worth something like £2 billion in sales a year. It isn’t just the overall size of the market that makes it so attractive to manufacturers, either. Processed pet food is incredibly profitable.

The argument goes that cats can’t eat bones because they will choke. Also, there is supposed to be a risk that the bones will splinter and cause some dreadful internal injury. This is not born out by fact, of course. In the wild, wolves (so closely related to dogs that they can interbreed) have been eating bones for millions of years. Bones provide about a third of a dog’s nutritional needs. The only bones that are risky are cooked bones or bones from very old animals – both of which can splinter. What holds true for dogs also applies to cats.

Bones are a healthy and safe source of nutrients to a cat and only become dangerous once they are cooked, which can make them too brittle.

Remember before processed food existed, owners fed their cats raw meat, bones and leftovers. Over the course of a century and a half manufacturers have persuaded us all that there was a better, cheaper and more convenient option.

Bones and organs are packed full of vital nutrients

Health Benefits

We use high quality meat and offal in all our natural cat products. All our meat, bone and offal are ground, frozen and vac packed to ensure the freshness quality that your cat would only eat in the wild.

Our complete raw food is selected and designed for health and nutritional purposes as it is natural. PurrForm complete raw meat and bone pouches contains all the vitamins and components that your cat requires on a daily basis to live a healthy and contented life

Feeding your cat, a complete raw food diet could have many benefits including a softer and shinier coat,  smaller more compact stool with less odour, increased energy, greater alertness and better oral health.

How to switch your pet to a raw diet.

This couldn’t have been made any easier with our pouches. All our flavours are balanced and complete cat food which mean that your cat can have a different meat to vary its meal. Transition from processed food to raw diet

Switching to a raw diet allows you to know what you are feeding your cat. You will feel much more comfortable knowing the wholesomeness of each ingredient you feed your cat.

Kittens need no transition; they take to raw food like ducks to water. Special kitten food is not necessary. They eat the same food as adult cats, just more of it and more often. Kittens need about twice as much food per ounce of body weight as an adult. All that growing to do! They need to eat more often than adults, about every 4 to 6 hours. If you’re getting a kitten(s), start them off right with a raw diet, and you won’t have to worry about transitioning them.

The key to transition for an older cat is patience. The transition can be fast or very slow. However long it takes, stick with it, it’s well worth it.

When switching from processed food or dry food diet remember the following:-

  • Be very patient as this could be a slow process
  • No matter how long it takes, stick with it it’s worth it.
  • Never switch diet instantly but instead mix the current diet with some of the raw diet.
  • Providing your cat with a variety of raw food is recommended.
  • Ideally before serving, the raw meat should be at room temperature as sometimes cold food can upset the stomach of your cat.
  • How much raw meat and bone diet should you feed your cat?
  • Food portion should be around 2% to 3% of the total body weight of your cat.
  • Food portion will also depend on your cat’s appetite as one day they might ravish their bowl and the next day they will eat half of their meal.
  • Kittens of 9 months can eat twice as much per gram of body weight as an adult cat as they are growing.
  • When feeding your cat set a routine whereby the food is given in the morning and in the evening, preferably at the same time each day.
  • Remove any un-eaten food after 30/45 minutes.

Feeding Tips

When serving Raw Frozen diet, please remember the following:-

  • Keep frozen until ready to prepare for feeding
  • For maximum food safety and freshness, defrost your cat daily portion by thawing it in the fridge for a minimum of 8 hours.
  • The food can be left at room temperature between 15 to 30 minutes before serving.
  • Once defrosted, use within 48 hours.
  • Do not heat or microwave the pouch and its content under any circumstances.
  • Once defrosted, DO NOT re-freeze.
  • Feed a 4 kg adult cat, 2 pouches of raw food per day.
  • An adult cat needs to eat between 2 and 3% of its own body weight every day to maintain a healthy weight.
  • Take care when handling raw meat, and ensure all utensils and surfaces are thoroughly cleaned after use.

Transition from processed food to raw diet.

Switching to a raw diet allows you to know what you are feeding your cat. You will feel much more comfortable knowing the wholesomeness of each ingredient you feed your cat. If you’re getting a kitten(s), start them off right with a raw diet, and you won’t have to worry about transitioning them.

The key to transition for an older cat is patience. The transition can be fast or very slow. However long it takes, stick with it, it’s well worth it.

How to transition.

Transitioning your cat onto raw food needs to be carried out over approximately 8 – 10 days. Cats have sensitive stomachs and any change in diet should be done gradually over a period of approximately 8 – 10 days.

Start by mixing about 10% of raw food with your cat’s current wet food.

Over the next few days, gradually increase the amount of raw food by about 10% per day and decrease the amount of the current diet.

This can be done until you have completely eliminated the need to the current diet and your cat is solely eating the raw.

If your cat is currently only eating dry food, the transition needs to be done slightly differently:

Put about 10g of raw food into your cat’s bowl. Then crunch and sprinkle a few bits of kibble over the top of the raw food.

Continue to do this for a few days and each day gradually increase the amount of raw food. Then, over the next few days, sprinkle less crushed kibble over the top until you have completely cut out the dry food.

Please give us a call if you have any questions or concerns relating to converting your cat onto a raw food diet.

When Switching from processed food or dry food diet remember the following

Be very patient as this could be a slow process

No matter how long it takes, stick with it, it’s worth it!

Never switch diet instantly but instead mix the current diet with some of the raw diet.

Providing your cat with a variety of raw food is recommended.

Ideally before serving, the raw meat should be at room temperature as sometimes cold food can upset the stomach of your cat.

How much raw meat and bone diet should you feed your cat?

Food portion should be around 2 to 3% of the total body weight of your cat.

Food portion will also depend on your cat’s appetite as one day they might ravish their bowl and the next day they will eat half of their meal.

kittens of 9 months can eat twice as much per gram of body weight as an adult cat as they are growing.

When feeding your cat set a routine whereby the food is given in the morning and in the evening, preferably at the same time each day.

Remove any un-eaten food after 30/45 minutes.

If you like to get more information about feeding your cats Purrform a raw complete cat food please ask one of our Scampers Pet Care Advisors.

Scampers Natural Pet Store is open seven days a week and easy to find on the A142 Soham By-pass between Ely and Newmarket.  

Scampers, Your Pet’s Natural Choice